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5 Benefits of Walking

There’s nothing quite like a good walk. It doesn’t require a gym membership or a bunch of equipment, and often gets you into the great outdoors.

It’s also very good for you, both physically and mentally. Indeed, all of the benefits of walking would make for a long list, but here are five main benefits that can inspire you to lace up your walking shoes and get moving.

1. Walking Improves Your Mood

You know how it is at the end of a long, trying day. You get home and are looking for something to help take the edge off a little bit. And a great way to do just that – is by taking a walk.

Studies show that walking affects our nervous system, so that we’ll feel a decrease in anger and hostility. Furthermore, walking outside exposes you to sunlight, which helps you cope with Seasonal Affective Disorder.

2. Walking Combats the Effects of Too Much Sitting

It has become clear in recent years that prolonged sitting has many negative health effects, including the damage it causes to leg arteries. But one study showed that taking even three, five-minute walks a day can reverse this damage.

If your job entails prolonged sitting, it’s helpful to take a short break every hour and go for a quick stroll.

3. Walking Boosts Your Immune System

We’ve already mentioned how great walking is as a stress-reliever, but it also improves your circulation, and helps give you a sense of overall calm. In turn, these factors boost your immune system – which helps your body fight diseases; from the common cold, up to more serious health problems.

Walking has even been shown to lessen menopause symptoms for older women.

4. Walking Lowers Your Risk of Chronic Disease

We’ve already touched on the positive impact walking has on your immune system and fending off diseases, but it’s worth a closer look:

  • Walking lowers your blood sugar levels and your overall risk for diabetes (according to the American Diabetes Association).
  • Another study showed that regular walking lowered blood pressure, and may significantly reduce the risk of stroke.
  • Studies also show that those who walked regularly, and met minimum physical activity guidelines had a lowered risk of cardiovascular disease.

5. Walking Helps Improve Your Creativity

The research is in: Walking and other physical activities will improve your creativity and help you find solutions – like those often faced at work –  to tricky problems. A study showed that walking produced twice as many creative responses in participants that walked, than those who were sitting for long periods.

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What is Occupational Therapy?

When it comes to health and rehabilitation professions, occupational therapists are truly a valuable resource.

Occupational therapy helps people optimize their ability to accomplish daily activities, through improving life skills following an injury or physical impairment. But there’s much more to occupational therapy than meets the eye – and in honor of National Occupational Therapy Month – let’s take a closer look.

What Do Occupational Therapists Do?

An occupational therapist works with people of all ages who are in need of specialized assistance because of physical, social, developmental, or emotional impairments. The occupational therapist helps patients lead more independent and productive lives by using daily activities such as self-care, work, play, and leisure as part of the therapeutic process.

A primary goal of an occupational therapist is to help patients improve their ability to carry out daily tasks. The occupational therapist will assess the patient’s home and work environment, and provide recommendations for how to adapt and lead a better quality of life. In short, occupational therapists help people with injuries, illnesses, and disabilities to live better lives.

What are Some Common Occupational Therapy Services?

  1. Occupational therapists often work with children with disabilities to help them participate fully in school and social activities.
  2. An occupational therapist may help someone who is recovering from an injury to regain needed day-to-day skills.
  3. The occupational therapist may provide support for older adults who are going through cognitive and physical changes.
  4. Occupational therapists will also do individualized evaluations, provide a customized rehabilitation plan, and ensure that outcomes are met throughout the rehabilitation process.
  5. While occupational therapists will sometimes directly treat injuries, they focus more often on helping the patient improve his or her life skills, while also incorporating adaptive tools that are sometimes created by the therapist.

Where Do Occupational Therapists Work?

An occupational therapist may work in a variety of settings, including: rehabilitation hospitals, nursing facilities, acute-care hospitals, outpatient clinics, home health, school systems, industry settings, and more. The types of places where an occupational therapist may work are growing annually.

In honor of National Occupational Therapy Month, we would like to thank all occupational therapists for what they do to help rehabilitate patients. We understand and appreciate the unique services that you provide!

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National Doctors’ Day

The world of medicine was changed forever on March 30, 1842, with the first documented use of anesthesia during surgery.

While the accomplishments of doctors has continued to evolve  – and amaze – since then, March 30 remains a special day in the world of medicine. After all, it’s now considered National Doctors’ Day – a day to recognize physicians and their countless contributions to society and their communities.

The first observance of National Doctors’ Day was in 1933, in Winder, Georgia. The wife of a local doctor wanted to have a day to honor physicians, and with the help of others, sent greeting cards and placed flowers on the graves of deceased doctors. Today, the red carnation is considered the symbolic flower for Doctors’ Day.

In 1991, President George H. Bush signed a bill that made National Doctors’ Day a day of celebration in the United States.

We’ll celebrate by giving thanks to the incredible doctors in our Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities and Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals. In both settings, our physicians are an integral part of the team that works with patients and their families to deliver the highest quality care possible.

Former Polish Prime Minister Eva Kopacz – who’s also a physician – wonderfully described the role of doctors as “a special mission, a devotion,” while saying that it called for “involvement, respect, and willingness to help all other people.”

Let’s all help celebrate National Doctors’ Day by giving physicians in our community a sincere word of thanks for their long hours, hard work, and constant care.

You can also observe this special day by using #NationalDoctorsDay to post on social media.

 

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The Role of Social Workers in the Long-Term Acute Care Setting

There’s no better time than now to highlight the role of social workers in the Long-Term Acute Care (LTACH) Setting. March, after all, is National Social Worker Month.

But the importance of the role and function of social workers in a LTACH is worthy of attention year-round. A social worker is a vital member of any health care team and serves in many different capacities, including as a liaison between the patient and the care community.

Let’s take a closer look:

Social Workers in the LTACH

  • Making the Transition
    The social worker helps the person entering a long-term acute care facility to help them make a transition to the LTACH from an acute care hospital. Once the patient is in their new setting at the LTACH, the social worker continues to see that his or her needs are met, and that they are participating in planning for continued care now and in the future.
  • Identifying Resources
    Social workers help patients identify resources to meet their individual needs. They also serve as the patient’s advocate in dealing with insurance providers to secure the most comprehensive coverage possible.
    In fact, serving as the patient’s advocate is one of the most important roles.
  • Working with Patients’ Families
    A social worker in an LTACH setting spends much of their time with a patient’s family and friends, and must always be aware of factors that have an impact on the patient’s well-being.
    Patients and families deal with many aspects of a specific illness, including learning more about it, the diagnosis, and the steps in the recovery process. A social worker helps them deal with each step that hopefully leads to a safe recovery.
  • A Wide Range of Tasks
    Typical duties for social worker may include: interaction with potential residents and their families, pre-admission and discharge planning, and assessment and completion of the part of the minimum data required for each patient.

The LTACH social worker will also:

  • Contact and utilize community resources on the resident’s behalf.
  • Ensure that the social and emotional needs of each patient are met.
  • Promote the maximum level of independence for each resident.
  • Participate fully in resident care planning as part of an interdisciplinary team.

In all cases, the social worker provides a physical environment that is supportive while fostering a positive self-image for residents through social contact, independence, and decision-making opportunities.

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A Heart Attack’s Effect on the Brain

It’s estimated that someone suffers a heart attack approximately every 40 seconds in the United States – or about 720,000 people each year. While many heart attack victims recover and resume their normal lives, others have to deal with lingering physical effects, such as changes in the brain.

Specifically, heart attacks and other forms of heart failure can cause a loss of gray matter in the brain, and a decline in mental processes.

What Happens During a Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when blood that brings oxygen to the heart is cut off, or severely reduced. Coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart can narrow because of fat buildup and other substances. When an artery breaks, a clot forms around the substance and blood flow is restricted to the heart muscle.

Oxygen and the Brain

The brain needs adequate oxygen to function normally. Research has shown that brain cells begin to die when oxygen levels drop significantly low for several minutes or longer. After an extended period, a permanent brain injury may occur. This type of injury is known as an anoxic brain injury, or also cerebral hypoxia.

There are four types of anoxia – with each potentially leading to brain damage – including stagnant anoxia, in which an internal condition (such as a heart attack) blocks oxygen-rich blood from reaching the brain.

Cognitive Issues Associated with Heart Attacks

A recent study by Sweden’s Lund University said that half of all heart attack survivors experience memory loss, attention problems, and other cognitive issues. Lasting effects on the brain’s mental functions could even lead to possible dementia.

Brain scans done in similar studies showed that heart disease and heart failure might lead to losses of gray matter in the brain that are important for a variety of cognitive functions, which in turn lead to issues such as:

  • Memory Loss
    Most people who suffer an anoxic brain injury experience some short-term memory loss. The hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning new information, is extremely sensitive to a lack of oxygen.
  • Anomia
    Anomia refers to difficulty in using words, or processing the meaning of words. The patient may not remember the right word, or use a word out of context.
  • Poor Performance in Executive Functions
    Executive functions include reasoning, processing information, judgment, etc. For instance, the patient may become impulsive and indecisive.
  • Visual Issues
    Patients also may have trouble processing visual information.

Treatment

Immediate treatment is essential when dealing with cerebral hypoxia. The sooner the normal oxygen supply is restored to the brain, the lower the risk of brain damage. The type of treatment depends on the cause of the anoxic injury and may include:

  • Breathing assistance via mechanical ventilation and oxygen.
  • Controlling the heart rate and rhythm.
  • The use of medicines such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, valproic acid, or general anesthetics.

The patient’s recovery depends on how long the brain lacked oxygen. The patient might have a full return to function if the oxygen supply to the brain was blocked only for a short time. The longer a person lacks this oxygen supply, the higher the risk for serious consequences, including death, and severe brain injury.

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10 Things to Know if Your Loved One is On a Ventilator

For patients who are unable to breathe on their own, mechanical ventilation is used to provide life-sustaining oxygen. Ventilation is a process that requires the diligent care of a medical team and a weaning process.

If you have a family member or loved one on a ventilator, here are some things you should know:

1. What is a Ventilator?

A ventilator is a machine that supports breathing, and is used mainly in a hospital or rehabilitation setting. Medical issues or conditions that make it hard for the patient to breathe necessitate that a ventilator is used to aid the breathing process.

2. How Does a Ventilator Work?

A ventilator helps get oxygen into the lungs of the patient and removes carbon dioxide (a waste gas that can be toxic). It is used for life support, but does not treat disease or medical conditions.

3. Who Needs a Ventilator?

Many conditions, such as pneumonia, COPD, brain injuries, and strokes require the use of a ventilator. If you have a loved one with a disease or condition that impairs their lung function, a ventilator will be employed. The use of a ventilator is also common when someone is under anesthesia during general surgery. A patient may not even know they were connected to a ventilator after the completion of the surgery or medical procedure.

4. Risks of Being on a Ventilator

Patients on ventilators run a higher risk of developing pneumonia because of bacteria that enters through the breathing tube. It can also make it difficult for them to cough and clear airways of irritants that can cause infections.

5. Eating While on a Ventilator

The breathing tube will prevent the patient from eating normally, so a different tube that provides nutrients, may be inserted into their vein. Patients who are on long-term ventilation may require a feeding tube directly inserted into the nose or mouth, or through a hole made in the stomach.

6. When Sedation is Used

Sedation is often used for patients on long-term ventilation, although there’s plenty of debate in medical circles concerning the over-use of sedation. The use of sedation often depends on the patient; a patient who is calm during normal life is usually calm on a ventilator while in an ICU unit.

7. A Ventilator Restricts Your Movement

A patient’s activity and movement are significantly limited while on a ventilator. While they may be able to sit up in bed or in a chair, their mobility is otherwise limited.

8. Your Care Will Involve a Team Approach

The medical team that closely monitors patients on a ventilator includes: doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, X-ray technicians, and more.

9. Will the Ventilator be Painful?

There’s usually little or no pain when on a ventilator.

10. Ventilator Weaning Process

Weaning is the process of taking someone off of a ventilator, so that they may begin to breathe on their own. The process usually begins with a short trial, in which they’re still connected to the ventilator, but allowed to breathe on their own. The ventilator is removed once it’s clear that the patient can breathe on their own.

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Flu Complications: The Importance of Immunizations

The flu is much more than an illness that simply leaves you bedridden for a few days. In some cases, it can lead to hospitalization and even death; in fact, estimates by the Centers for Disease Control say that flu-related hospitalizations since 2010 number in the hundreds of thousands.

With numbers like those, the importance of immunizations is obvious.

What is The Flu?

Influenza is a respiratory infection that can cause moderate to severe health complications – from ear infections to pneumonia while triggering other severe issues such as inflammation of the heart and multi-organ failure. Typical flu symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle and body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting and diarrhea, particularly in children

How Does The Flu Vaccine Work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body that protect against infections caused by the disease. Vaccines are available both by injection and nasal spray, although the CDC recommends not using the nasal spray as protection against the flu in 2016-17.

There are two types of flu vaccines available, trivalent and quadrivalent. Trivalent vaccines are so named because they consist of three components, and includes a high-dose shot that’s approved for people 65 and over. Quadrivalent vaccines consist of four components.

Trivalent vaccines are considered more traditional and protect against the H1N1 and H3N2 viruses and an influenza B virus. Quadrivalent vaccines protect against an additional B virus.

Who Should Get The Flu Vaccine?

The CDC recommends that everyone six months or older should get an annual flu shot. The vaccination is important for everyone, but especially so for those who are at high risk for influenza complications – including pregnant women, older adults, and young children.

Also, certain chronic medical conditions can increase your risk of serious flu complications, such as asthma, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other respiratory complications, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, HIV/AIDS, obesity, and kidney or liver disease.

Why Should I Get A Flu Shot Every Year?

The flu virus changes every year, and new vaccines designed to keep with those changes are released annually. Last year’s vaccine might not protect you from this year’s virus, while antibodies produced by your immune system decline over time.

Who Shouldn’t Be Vaccinated?

You should check with your physician before getting the flu vaccine if you’re allergic to eggs (most flu vaccines contain a small amount of egg protein), or if you’ve had a severe reaction to a previous flu vaccine.

When Should I Get The Vaccine?

You should get immunized as soon after the latest flu vaccine becomes available, which is typically in early fall. But vaccinations are usually offered as long as viruses are circulating. Most flu seasons usually peak in January and even later.

The bottom line is that the flu shot is the single best way to protect yourself from the flu and potentially serious complications that come with it. And flu shots are now widely available – including at pharmacies – and don’t require an appointment.

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7 Ways to Tame COPD Flare-Ups in Winter Months

If you’re a COPD sufferer whose symptoms are worse in the winter, you’re not alone. Studies show that the number of patients needing treatment for COPD exacerbations is twice as high in the winter as during the summer.

Why is this so? One reason is that cold weather affects the lungs by causing dramatic changes to the respiratory system. For some individuals, breathing cold, dry air forces their body to produce more shifts in temperature and moisture in the airway because there is a greater volume of air that needs to be warmed and humidified.

No matter the exact cause, the bottom line is that COPD sufferers need to take extra precaution in the winter to avoid serious flare-ups – not the least of which is avoiding the frigid air as much as possible. Here are some strategies:

  • Always Cover Your Nose and Mouth

Covering your nose and mouth while outdoors in the winter is essential if you’re a COPD sufferer. A scarf works well, as does a painter’s mask. At the least, cup your hands and use them to cover your nose and mouth.

  • Get Flu and Pneumonia Shots
    Viruses and infections will make your COPD symptoms worse. Make sure you get a flu shot annually and consult with your physician about getting a pneumonia shot.
  • Wash Your Hands
    Your mother was right – you need to wash your hands! Seriously, a strong defense against germs and COPD symptoms is a high standard of hygiene. Carefully wash your hands before touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. It’s even more important when you’re in public places.
  • Stay hydrated
    Drinking plenty of water will make it easier for you to breathe, especially if you have a respiratory infection.
  • Avoid People Who Are Sick
    It’s sometimes easier said than done, particularly in a workplace (or if you work with and around children), but it’s important to avoid sick people whenever possible. If you do catch a cold or the flu, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible.
  • Add Humidity To Your Air
    Keeping your home from becoming too dry during the winter months is also essential if you suffer from COPD. Use a humidifier and clean it every other day to keep it functioning at its optimal level.
  • Avoid Smoke and Fumes
    This is an important strategy at any time of the year, but take extra caution in the winter if you’re heating your home with a fireplace, kerosene, or by other means. Lung irritants such as wood smoke can cause COPD exacerbations.

How to Know That You’re Having a Flare-Up

There are numerous signs that indicate when you’re having a COPD flare-up:

  • Your shortness of breath is suddenly worse and you experience wheezing.
  • You’re coughing more – with or without mucus.
  • If you have mucus, the amount or color may change.
  • You have a fever.
  • You suddenly feel very tired.
  • You become confused or depressed.

No matter what your symptoms are, it’s always important to see your doctor when they get worse. Prevention strategies combined with prompt action will help you stay healthy throughout the winter months.

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Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital celebrates 10 years of helping patients with serious respiratory conditions

(photo) Dr. David York, a pulmonary and critical care physician, and Diane Joralmon, a respiratory manager at Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital in Post Falls help patients achieve better breathing outcomes.

The beep worried Linda Sprenger.

As she drove her husband, Mike, to their home in Moscow — *Beep!* — from North Idaho Advanced Care Hospital in Post Falls, thoughts began to weigh on her mind. What if the machine stops working? *Beep!* What if the machine stops working and Mike stops breathing? *Beep!*

Linda got home. The white knuckle drive was over. But a new stress of caring for her husband of 28 years was just emerging. Mike has ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. He now relies on a ventilator to keep him alive.

“It’s scary,” said Linda. “I don’t have a huge amount of people to take care of him. You’re alone and you’ve got this machine and you’re looking at it every time it makes a sound.”

Not that it’s much consolation, but Linda isn’t alone. Every day, an average of 15 Americans are newly diagnosed with ALS — more than 5,600 people per year. As many as 30,000 Americans may currently be affected by ALS. Annually, ALS is responsible for two deaths per 100,000 people. The average life expectancy of a person with ALS is two to five years from time of diagnosis.

Mike, 51, has had the disease for five years. He can’t speak or move without the assistance of a wheelchair. Yet he is able to text messages, and they celebrated the birth of their first grandchild on Christmas Eve.

“He’s doing really well,” said Linda. “I am so grateful.”

Last August, the couple experienced a scare when Mike got pneumonia. He was own to Spokane for a tracheotomy. Eventually he was transferred to Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital as part of his recovery. He spent 35 days at the Post Falls hospital.

“It was one of the most amazing hospitals I have ever been in,” said Linda. “They were with us 24 hour hours a day and they really cared for us.”

The hospital, which celebrates its 10-year anniversary on Feb. 17, provides long-term acute and critical care services to patients throughout the Inland Northwest who are recovering from serious illnesses or injuries. To date, Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital has served more than 4,000 patients. Often these individuals need care for medically complex conditions such as trauma, infectious diseases, wound healing, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and amputations, and respiratory failure.

“They provided all the training I needed,” said Linda. “I know how the machine works, how to clean it and when to call a technician.”

For ALS patients, respiratory issues become a matter of life and death.

“Respiratory failure occurs when there isn’t enough oxygen passing from the lungs into the body’s bloodstream,” explained Dr. Kevin Strait, Medical Director of Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital. “Oxygen-rich blood is needed to help the body’s organs – such as the heart and brain – function properly. Respiratory failure also can occur if a patient’s lungs can’t remove carbon dioxide from the blood. Carbon dioxide is a waste gas that also can harm a body’s organs.”

The 40-bed facility, at 600 Cecil in Post Falls, features all private patient rooms, and an 8-bed high- observation critical care unit.

Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital is the first hospital in Idaho, and the fifth in the nation to receive the Joint Commission’s disease-specific certification for Respiratory Failure. The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization, accredits and certifies nearly 21,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. Joint Commission accreditation and certification is recognized nationwide as a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to meeting certain performance standards.

All patient rooms include cardiac monitoring equipment and mechanical ventilators. The hospital also features a 2,590-square-foot therapy gym with private therapy rooms and a heated aquatic therapy pool.

By MARC STEWART – Coeur d’Alene Press

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Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital helps patients recover from serious health issues

(photo) John Bierne nearly died from kidney failure, liver failure and congestive heart failure. He spent several months at Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital in Post Falls, recovering and rehabilitating. Photo by Marc Stewart.

John Bierne looks and feels like a new man.

The Twin Lakes Village resident nearly died from kidney failure, liver failure and congestive heart failure — at 39 years of age.

“I was 456 pounds,” said Bierne. “I kept gaining weight and I wasn’t feeling right. My breathing was off. I had sleep apnea. I should have gone to the doctor months earlier and gotten some simple blood work done.”

Instead, Bierne continued to make poor health choices and worked long hours as a project manager for a local construction company to help provide for his wife, Theresa, and their 3-year-old daughter, Kylie.

It all caught up with him March 19, 2015. Bierne collapsed while visiting his mother’s house. When paramedics arrived he wasn’t breathing. They managed to resuscitate him and get him to the hospital — where he hovered near death in the intensive care unit for weeks.

“The doctors told my family that I had about a 1 percent chance of living,” he said. “I’ve been told I coded several times, but I didn’t die. I don’t remember any of it. I don’t remember collapsing or being in the hospital.”

Doctors drained 131 pounds of uid from Bierne’s body, much of it around his lungs. They also discovered he had an enlarged heart and that his kidneys weren’t getting enough oxygen.

“I was prepared to be on dialysis the rest of my life,” he said. “I knew my life was going to be different from that point on.”

Bierne spent a month in the hospital, then was transferred to Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital in Post Falls to begin a long and difficult road of recovery.

Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital provides long-term acute and critical care services to patients throughout the Inland Northwest who are recovering from serious illnesses or injuries. Bierne had severe problems to contend with, given his weight and organs in severe distress.

“When I first saw John, he looked pretty rough,” said Kate Smead, lead therapist at Northern Advanced Care. “He was a big guy and he was hooked up to a ventilator with all kinds of tubes going in and out of his body. I wasn’t sure what he was going to be able to do.”

Diane Joralmon, respiratory therapy manager at Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital, said Bierne’s breathing quickly improved, but he faced long-term health challenges.

“He had trouble sitting up and he was on oxygen,” said Joralmon. “He did well with the lung therapy and responded to it. He’s feisty.”

John was weaned off the ventilator and began breathing on his own. However, one of his most pressing health issues was a nasty bedsore. Despite steadily increasing his mobility and strength once he reached Northern Idaho Advanced Care, months of lying in bed had taken its toll and his skin and muscles had deteriorated into a horrific state.

“John had a stage 4 pressure ulcer,” said Morgan Pitschka, wound management specialist at the hospital. “He was so sick, he couldn’t be moved. This led to a substantial bedsore. He basically had a gaping wound that would eventually require plastic surgery. ”

Treating his wound was delicate and required using negative pressure with a device that vacuums the injured area and treats it with medical foam. In addition, he was given a matrix of protein supplements to help his body build new tissue.

Bierne healed quickly with continuous supervision and care from his medical team. In short order, he was up and out of bed, ready for the next challenge. The medical team picked up on his macho attitude and used it as a motivator.

“I treated him like I was his drill sergeant and his friend,” said Smead, who designed his physical therapy sessions. “I gave him a hard time. I pushed him. Whereas other patients need to be treated with kid gloves, John needed somebody who wouldn’t back down when he got down or didn’t want to do something.”

Bierne spent about three months in Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital.

Despite the grim prognosis, he never believed he would die and tackled his rehabilitation with a vengeance. If he was asked to take 60 steps on the first day, he went for 180 steps. If he was told to go 10 minutes on the treadmill, he went 20…

Today, the 6-foot-1 man is 255 pounds and his caregivers at Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital describe him as looking “fantastic” and “amazing.” His kidneys are now functioning normally and his liver has bounced back. He exercises regularly and eats nutritiously. He was even able to go elk hunting in the fall — something that surprised his caregivers.

“I’ve been an athlete all of my life,” he said. “Death never entered my mind. I just took it day by day. I wanted to do more every day and keep improving. I am so grateful to everyone at Northern Advanced Care Hospital. They really saved my life.”

By MARC STEWART – Coeur d’Alene Press

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